Fyodor Dostoyevsky: Books, Bio
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Fyodor Dostoyevsky Novels & Writings

The Brothers Karamazov
(translated by Constance Garnett)

Crime and Punishment (Signet Classics)
(Translated by Sidney Monas)

(Constance Garnett Translation)

The Grand Inquisitor
With Related Chapters from the Brothers Karamazov
(translated by Constance Garnett)

The Idiot
(translated by Richard Pevear)

Notes From The Underground
(translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky)

The Double and The Gambler
(translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky)

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Fyodor Dostoyevsky Bio

Feodor DostoyevskyFyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky (11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881) sometimes translated Dostoevsky, was a Russian writer of novels, short stories and essays. Dostoyevsky's literary works explore human psychology in the troubled political, social and spiritual context of 19th-century Russian society. Although Dostoyevsky began writing books in the mid-1850s, his best remembered work was done in his last years, including Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. He wrote eleven novels, three novellas, seventeen short novels and three essays and is often acknowledged by critics as one of the greatest and most prominent psychologists in world literature. This page is dedicated to his masterpieces.¹


Fyodor Dostoyevsky Quotes

"For what is man without desires, without free will, and without the power of choice but a stop in an organ pipe?" - Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from the Underground

"Every man has some reminiscences which he would not tell to everyone, but only to his friends. He has others which he would not reveal even to his friends, but only to himself, and that in secret. But finally there are still others which a man is even afraid to tell himself, and every decent man has a considerable number of such things stored away. That is, one can even say that the more decent he is, the greater the number of such things in his mind." - Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from the Underground

"People speak sometimes about the 'bestial' cruelty of man, but that is terribly unjust and offensive to beasts, no animal could ever be so cruel as a man, so artfully, so artistically cruel." - Fyodor Dostoevsky

"Sarcasm: the last refuge of modest and chaste-souled people when the PRIVACY of their soul is coarsely and intrusively invaded." - Fyodor Dostoevsky

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